Sour Cream Green Bean Casserole – A Mid-Century Thanksgiving Recipe Re-Run

Posted on Nov 16 2016 - 3:51am by RetroRuth

This recipe is a fantastic alternative if you can’t stand the traditional cream of mushroom soup version of green bean casserole. I can’t, and this has seriously saved me. Enjoy!

I hope everyone has a nice big, traditional meal planned this year! Because I don’t. Well, I guess we are having turkey and Vincent Price’s Pumpkin Pie but in my family we don’t normally make bread stuffing or sweet potatoes with marshmallows on top. (Mostly because my dad is diabetic). And we are NOT making the traditional green bean casserole.

Instead we are making Sour Cream Green Bean Casserole!

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Sour Cream Green Bean Casserole
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 3 T butter
  • 2 T flour
  • 1 t salt
  • ½ t pepper
  • 1 t sugar
  • ½ t grated onion (I subbed onion powder)
  • 1 cup dairy sour cream
  • 2 (12 oz) pkgs French-style frozen green beans (I subbed fresh)
  • ½ lb grated sharp cheese
  • ½ cup corn flakes
Instructions
  1. Combine flour, butter and cook gently. Remove from heat, stir in seasonings and cream.
  2. Cook beans until tender; drain. Fold in cream mixture, place in shallow 1 qt casserole and cover with cheese and then cornflake crumbs mixed with 1 T butter.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Serves 6

This recipe is from The Queen’s Book, a community cookbook from 1967. I picked this one because I get so flippin’ sick of green bean casserole, even if we make it from scratch with fresh green beans and a homemade mushroom cream sauce. This year I wanted to try out something different!

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Do you have a dish on your Thanksgiving table that you make every year but secretly can’t stand it?

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Green bean casserole with canned beans and canned cream of mushroom soup is like that for me.  Also, I hate turkey.

You heard me.

Hate. It.

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Every year I try to convince them to let me make something else, but they always insist on turkey.

But I think I can make some headway this year with the bean casserole substitution.

Tom TastesIMG_3392

“How is it?”

“Good. You know I love casseroles with cornflake topping.”

The Verdict: Good!

From The Tasting Notes –

Very good casserole with a creamy sauce and a crunchy topping. The sauce was very easy to make, just as easy as opening a can of cream of mushroom soup. Would be a great substitution for the ever-present traditional green bean casserole at Thanksgiving dinner!

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I love everything retro, vintage, mid-century, kitsch and all things atomic! A 21st century housewife just trying to fit in...to the 50's. I have a passion for vintage recipes and an enormous vintage cookbook collection that I keep testing, even though by now I should know better. Creator of Mid-Century Menu (www.midcenturymenu.com), No Pattern Required (www.nopatternrequired.com), and I Ate The 80's (www.iatethe80s.com).

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11 Comments so far. Feel free to join this conversation.

  1. Katri November 16, 2016 at 4:07 pm - Reply

    Maybe I can talk my mother into making this. The only person that likes traditional green been casserole is Dad! I feel so bad for you, no stuffing! It’s the only thing I like at Thanksgiving…LOL

  2. The Atomic Mom November 16, 2016 at 9:19 pm - Reply

    Oh, thank you for hating turkey. Five years ago, when I was pregnant with my second child, turkey totally grossed me out at Thanksgiving. I still have not recovered from that. I also wish for anything else on Thanksgiving.

  3. Lisa B. November 17, 2016 at 12:46 pm - Reply

    Me too! I like picking at the crunchy skin when it just comes out of the oven. I want ONE turkey sandwich the next day, and that’s it for me.

    And in my family, we’ve never done the green bean casserole. We do steamed fresh green beans with butter toasted sliced almonds on the side.

    I think I would be such a meanie if I didn’t share this: My mom’s sweet potatoes are to die for—peeled, sliced, and layered raw with butter and brown sugar (I KNOW) and a little salt, covered, then into the oven with the turkey for however long it takes for them to get tender.They can hang there longer, too, without a problem. By that time the potatoes are nestled in just enough toffee. I have never tasted any other sweet potato casserole that I liked better.

  4. Lisa B. November 17, 2016 at 12:50 pm - Reply

    By the way, she’s been doing sweet potatoes like this for Thanksgiving for as long as I can remember, so it’s DEFINITELY mid century modern.

  5. jen November 17, 2016 at 1:25 pm - Reply

    This sounds like it would be ok, but I love the mushroom version. What I absolutely DESPISE, however, is pumpkin pie. Or pumpkin anything for that matter. We do have a cranberry jello salad we’ve been making for 4 generations now, I taught my 8 year old daughter how to make it last year. You need a bag of fresh cranberries, 4-6 (depending on size) golden delicious or similar type apples, 2 cans of mandarin oranges, a can of crushed pineapple, 2 cups sugar and 2 big boxes of lemon jello. Start by putting a colander inside a large bowl. Take a grinder or food processor and run the cranberries, oranges and apple slices through until ground but still a bit chunky. Pour into colander so juice can drip through into bowl. Add crushed pineapple directly to colander. Let sit several minutes to allow as much juice to drip through as possible. Measure juice and add if necessary add enough bottled juice to total 2 cups liquid. Bring to boil, add jello and sugar and stir til dissolved. Pour this back into the ground fruit mixture, taste and add a bit more sugar if needed. Pour into mold if desired and chill overnight.

  6. Twincats November 22, 2016 at 5:37 pm - Reply

    I also hate pumpkin and am not a big turkey fan. I don’t mind having turkey ONCE a year, so either Xmas or Tksgiving I have a ham, instead, especially since I have tweaked Ruth’s ham casserole recipe and me and husband love it!

    Instead of pumpkin pie, I make tiramisu; been doing that since the early 90s, so it’s ensconced as a tradition now!

    I do like traditional green bean casserole, though. I’m thinking of adding some sour cream to it, though, sounds yummy.

  7. Leslie November 23, 2016 at 7:39 pm - Reply

    My mother used to make a version of this green bean casserole, but she added corn and a Ritz cracker- slivered almond topping. It was divine!

  8. Maggie December 29, 2016 at 9:09 am - Reply

    Made these for Christmas. So easy to make! They were a hit!
    Thank you for the recipe,

  9. Shameless Buttercream November 10, 2017 at 7:33 pm - Reply

    RetroRuth, I think you may be my Thanksgiving soulmate! Long before I was vegetarian, I hated turkey. If families feel they must serve a “traditional” dinner, why not roast a chicken (or two) instead?

    Green-bean casserole was never served in my childhood family, but it was in my husband’s. Having an aversion to anything made with “Cream of X” canned soup, canned green vegetables, and mushrooms in ANY form, I reinvented the recipe a few years ago using better ingredients.

    I usually use frozen French-cut green beans unless I want to julienne fresh ones, which is VERY time-consuming. The green beans are mixed with homemade white sauce and carmelized onions, then everything is topped with Swiss cheese, parmesan cheese, and breadcrumbs. It’s much better than the original, but I only make this in a small casserole dish because it’s not especially good as a leftover.

    This year, if I make my Stroganoff/Romanoff sauce (white sauce with 0.5 cup of sour cream added), for my “gratin haricot verts,” I think my husband will be very happy: he loves sour cream!

    • RetroRuth November 10, 2017 at 8:33 pm - Reply

      You are the third person who has told me they add Swiss to their green bean casserole! I think I might have to try that this year!

  10. chrisanthemama December 9, 2017 at 3:45 pm - Reply

    Substitute crumbled potato chips for corn flakes, and gruyere for cheddar, and maybe add some crumbled cooked bacon–how ’bout that.

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